SEP/OCT 2019 Archive HOME > SEP/OCT 2019

Royal Bay is blooming and booming! And there’s no slowing down on the horizon for GableCraft Homes.

You may have already heard that the West Shore’s only seaside master-planned community is currently underway on rezoning the land south of Latoria Boulevard for a future commercial village that would bring desired amenities to Royal Bay. Amenities like a grocery store, an elementary school and more park space! In the meantime, they are busy working on updates to Metchosin Road, installing a traffic light at Ryder Hesjedal Way and Latoria Boulevard, and a temporary brand new pop-up coffee shop that should open this fall.

A lot of people dread moving houses because it’s such an emotional, stressful experience. Whether you’re moving cities or simply heading to a new place in town, it’s still a tough job. While it can be an ordeal, there are ways you can make it less painful.

A great strategy to combat the stress is to pack non-essential items gradually, and in advance, so that you don’t find yourself packing in a rush the day of your move. Leave packing everyday items closer to moving day. Making a moving day itinerary will help you can keep track of items and where you want them placed in your new home.

Moving is physically exhausting at the best of times. Hauling heavy boxes and furniture in and out of a truck isn’t something you may want to take on any time soon. One of the best ways around this is to hire a moving company to take care of the heavy lifting.

In 2019, Maclean’s magazine gathered data on 415 communities across Canada to identify the best spots to live in Canada. They were looking for what they call “supercharged small towns”—communities with rural charm with close access to urban jobs. They defined a “community” as a town or city with its own mayor.

They selected and compared 415 communities using the following categories: wealth and economy, affordability, population growth, taxes, commute, crime, weather, access to health care, amenities and culture.

And guess what? Three of our West Shore municipalities made the list as towns that are offering an attractive alternative to big-city living!

Colyn Strong, President and Founder of Shift Energy Group, saw the value of energy efficiencies first hand, during the years he managed energy efficiency projects in the public sector and later when he facilitated public sector energy projects with engineers and contractors.

His curiosity encouraged him to assess the viability of solar as a business division back in 2014 when only a few early adopters were willing to take the leap.

“Times have changed since then. It’s still not a mature, mainstream market,” says Strong, “but it’s changing fast. More and more, solar is becoming economically viable as an alternative energy solution for home owners and organizations.”

As we quickly approach the Opening Day for Westshore’s most exciting new multi-family rental development, Crossing at Belmont, we wanted to provide you with an update on the latest news. 60 percent of the units in the West building, which is the first to open, have already been leased. Don’t miss your chance to be among the lucky first residents to call this urban, rental community, home.

Crossing at Belmont, features multiple living options including; one bedroom, one bedroom plus flex, and two bedroom suites. Pet-friendly, functional amenities, shopping and other retail at your fingertips, and a location that epitomizes convenience.

It wasn’t that long ago that technological innovation was mostly associated with the computer industry. A steady stream of electronic devices and digital services—that improve so quickly, they become obsolete in a few years—continue to impact our lives in ways we never imagined a few decades ago.

Today, with climate change ever-present, the need for fundamental new discoveries across a network of diverse industries has never been greater. Innovation today is less about getting a competitive silo advantage and more about experimenting and researching possibilities in collaboration with others; finding ways to re-imagine aspects of our economy so we can continue to prosper with the lowest possible environmental impact. The shift underway will be explosive; unlike anything we’ve experienced since electricity and the internal combustion engine took center stage early in the 20th century.

There’s a lot of buzz around food technology these days. How do we create food systems that meet the needs of our changing world and what role does technology play? How can B.C. harness new technologies and innovations to produce more food, jobs and prosperity, while reducing waste?

It’s attracting a lot of research and investment.

I spoke to B.C.’s Minister of Agriculture and Saanich South MLA Lana Popham for an update about some ground-breaking agri-initiatives at work in our province. She’s been travelling B.C. to learn about agriculture issues for a decade now and what she is seeing is inspiring: small farms all over the province doing a lot of amazing things—and creating “a renaissance of experimentation around food culture and food processing.”

Here are a few examples of B.C. initiatives underway she told me about that are levelling the playing field for small farmers and food entrepreneurs:

If you have lived in the West Shore long enough, you probably already know that Sooke School District #62 is one of the fastest-growing and most progressive school districts in B.C. It currently has over 11,000 students in a district that extends all the way up to Port Renfrew.

For committed people like Ravi Parmar, School Board Chair, and one of 7 trustees for Sooke School District #62, its oversight is a huge responsibility—far bigger than most people realize.

“As trustees, as elected politicians, we are responsible for a lot,” says Parmar. “The budget for the entire province is a record $2.7 billion this year. It will be used for capital investments for new schools, expansions, seismic upgrades and land purchases for future schools. Our operating budget is $150M for a staff of 1,600 people.”

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